An analysis of satans speech to the sun in john miltons epic poem paradise lost

Volume 3, Issue 3, MayPages: To cite this article: International Journal of Literature and Arts. There are controversial debates over this issue, and most critics believe that, although Satan acts and speaks heroically, God is the real hero of the poem, not Satan.

An analysis of satans speech to the sun in john miltons epic poem paradise lost

Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton. It was originally published in in ten books, with a total of over ten thousand individual lines of verse.

The first speech reveals Satan as someone who is burning with proud contempt, unyielding hatred towards the Almighty and study of revenge arising out of injured merit.

What matter where if I be still the same.

An analysis of satans speech to the sun in john miltons epic poem paradise lost

Towards the end of the speech Satan is reduced to a crafty, desperate, malicious character who seeks to quench his thirst for revenge by wrecking havoc in the lives of the innocent creatures of the new world that Satan was rumored to create.

Thus we see how the succeeding speeches of Satan mark a degeneration of his image from a heroic stubborn fighter and mighty leader with undaunted spirit to a villainous demon who is ready to adopt the vilest means to satisfy his filthy design.

Milton sought to bring classical antiquity to his readers and inspire them with his bold effects stemming from an egotistical sublimity as well as a proud humility.

An Analysis of Satan's Soliloquy in John Milton's "Paradise Lost" Essay Example | Graduateway

This makes Milton exclusively meant for readers who can keep pace with his exalted grandeur and his larger-than-life allusions and references to classical myths, history, Biblical sources etcetera. The Grand Style of Paradise Lost Book 1 deserves special treatment as it is a composite of several features.

Epic decorum is molded with a nuanced rhythm as well as an idiosyncratic musicality achieved by a masterly use of alliteration and onomatopoeia. Indeed a Babylonish dialect is identifiable in his lines but this is not because Milton was callous to the intrinsic nature of English but because the grandeur of his subject matter and epic decorum demanded such artificiality and complication.

Satan, God or Adam cannot be expected to talk in the language of ordinary life.

Satans speech to the sun in lines , Book IV of Miltons Paradise Lost, Satan is torn between the many emotions of sadness, anger, doubt and acceptance. Satan expresses regret at having fallen so far, but then he resents the fact that he had to fall and wonders if others were given pref. Paradise Lost, Satan in Paradise, The Classic Epic Hero Previous post Close Reading of a Passage in Othello by Shakespeare: Analysis of the Presence of Racism Next post Comparison of the Use of Irony and Satire in "A Modest Proposal" and "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift. In the meantime, Satan, sitting on the edge of the Earth, cannot see the way to Man. Satan disguises himself as a cherub and flies to the sun to talk with the archangel, Uriel. Uriel shows Satan the way to .

In words of Macaulay, it is a style that no rival has been able to equal and no parodist has been able to degrade. Epic Similes in Paradise Lost: These similes are present in plenty in the Book 1 of this epic and are a ready reckoner of the poetic imagery of Milton and bear testimony to his stylistic innovations while adhering to tradition.

Miltonic similes are used by the poet for illustration as well as decoration. They go beyond the point of comparison and open up a vista of associations or a succession of images that are beautiful and suggestive. Thus in the elaborate comparison of the shield of Satan to the moon, Milton apparently departs from the main point of the comparison to tell of Galileo and how he observes the moon through his telescope on the hills in order to discover new lands on its spotty surface.

Such myriad of associations transports our mind to different spheres and helps us think more vividly and with more emotion about the shield of Satan. The fallen angels have been very appropriately compared to the scattered sedge of broken chariot wheels and the carcasses of the King Busiris and his Memphian chivalry who while pursuing the fleeing Israelites with treacherous hatred were overthrown by the waves of the Red Sea after it was vexed by the fierce wind Orion.

Certain similes employed by Milton are of immediate relevance and at the same time they reverberate with significance in the wider context of the poem as a whole. A fitting example would be the simile in which Satan is compared owing to magnificent stature to the vast sea-monster Leviathan who roamed in oceans.

While making this comparison, Milton brings up the old legend of night-time sea-men who upon mistaking the sea-monster to be an island anchor their ships to his scaly rind. The sailors are deluded by the monster just like Eve was deluded by Satan.

Thus Leviathan, the traditional deceiver becomes an emblem of Satan. Such long similes had to face the scorn of anti-Miltonist critics.

Eliot found these similes to be an unnecessary digression that distracted readers from the real subject matter but in this context one must remember that an epic poet such as Milton works on a larger-than-life canvas which gives him the liberty to expand the image beyond the dimension which the occasion requires.

Moreover, the addition of such similes did not impede the narrative, but emphasized upon it by their subtle relevance. Milton radicalizes both Biblical History and erstwhile classical epics to create his magnum opus that is unparalleled in both beauty as well as grandeur and from this perspective his individual approach to his epic similes is as commendable as his grand style.Paradise Lost, Satan in Paradise, The Classic Epic Hero Previous post Close Reading of a Passage in Othello by Shakespeare: Analysis of the Presence of Racism Next post Comparison of the Use of Irony and Satire in "A Modest Proposal" and "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift.

See a complete list of the characters in Paradise Lost and in-depth analyses of Satan, Adam, Eve, God, and The Son.

John Milton's Paradise Lost is a work of enduring charm and value because of its theological conceptions, its beautiful language, and its "updating" of the epic to the modern world's values. Book II of this epic poem opens with Satan's speech to his minions in hell, proposing war on Heaven itself. Paradise Lost, Satan in Paradise, The Classic Epic Hero Previous post Close Reading of a Passage in Othello by Shakespeare: Analysis of the Presence of Racism Next post Comparison of the Use of Irony and Satire in "A Modest Proposal" and "Gulliver's Travels" by Jonathan Swift. In Milton's classic epic poem Paradise Lost the reader gains a judicious and even controversial vision of Satan as the protagonist of the epic. This is in direct contrast with our current idea and opinion of Satan as the leading nominal of evil and darkness.

John Milton's Paradise Lost as Christian Epic Essay example - Paradise Lost as Christian Epic John Milton's great epic poem, Paradise Lost, was written between the 's and in England, at a time of rapid change in the western world. An Analysis of Satan's Soliloquy in John Milton's "Paradise Lost" Essay.

In the eighty-two lines that consist of Satan’s famous soliloquy in Book IV (lines 32 to ) of John Milton’s Paradise Lost, one is given a great deal to think about.

John Milton's Paradise Lost is a work of enduring charm and value because of its theological conceptions, its beautiful language, and its "updating" of the epic to the modern world's values.

Book II of this epic poem opens with Satan's speech to his minions in hell, proposing war on Heaven itself. Come and learn about Milton's famous portrayal of Satan in ''Paradise Lost,'' analyzing Satan's physical description, his surprisingly uplifting speech, and his dramatic fall from heaven and then.

SparkNotes: Paradise Lost