An analysis of the concept of fate and destiny in oedipus the king and antigone by sophocles

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An analysis of the concept of fate and destiny in oedipus the king and antigone by sophocles

Post-Cyberpunkbeing a reaction against the extreme Romanticism of the Cyberpunk genre, is the most obvious example. Is a Crapshootcreating an AI is asking for war. Scale of Scientific Sins: Portraying some branches of science and technology as inherently evil.

Romanticism saw science and logic as inferior to emotion, and therefore science alone would come to wrong conclusions. The Spark of Genius: Romanticism often portrays all creative activity as something defying all rational explanation - and science is no exception when scientists are not portrayed as Straw Vulcans.

The more anvilicious Romanticist works may feature such characters, portraying characters that are supposed to be epitomes of logic as shallow caricatures, who ironically are not very logical. Romanticist utopias are often led by supernatural characters, ones that are fundamentally above mere mortals.

A milder version of Ludd Was Right. A character adheres to their theories, rejecting conflicting facts that are even truthful. That character is expected to be emotionally brokenor worseif they are in a situation where maintaining their filter is impossible.

Three Chords and the Truth: That one does not need a thorough formal education to produce good music - or that "good" equals "raw" and "unpolished" - is a very Romanticist argument.

Romanticists are usually Naturalists who portray Enlightened Utilitarians as willing to go to extremes for the sake of Utopia. Transhumanism is on the Scale of Scientific Sinsand creating a transhuman much like creating an AI or any other form of artificial life is likely to result in them being evil.

The play, Oedipus the King, by Sophocles, shares very similar ideas of fate as the movie Crash. Fate is the idea that the outcome of events are out of our control, that your life is predetermined. May teach you more of man, Of moral evil and of good, Than all the sages can." A World Half Full: No matter how bad the world gets in an Enlightenment story, there will always be hope for improvement. Obstructive Bureaucrat (=bureaucracy is bad) The Power of Love: If one's love is strong enough, it. In Oedipus the King, the actor playing Oedipus wore a mask showing him simply as a king, while in Oedipus at Colonus, Oedipus appears in the mask of an old man. As Sophocles saw him — and as actors portrayed him — Oedipus displayed no personality or individuality beyond his role in the legend.

As noted in Immortality Immoralityachieving immortality just like transhumanism as a whole is on the Scale of Scientific Sinsso immortality in Romanticist works, if achievable, will carry a number of unpleasant consequences.

The World Is Not Ready: Science must not progress too quickly, otherwise disaster will follow. A setting in which everyone is highly emotional.

Romantics believe heavily in prophecies, saying that they will occur no matter what. Common Tropes Tropes shared between them, but handled in different ways: Cynicism have protagonists with this belief.

The difference is in how their beliefs are handled. The Romantic may assert that human nature of love must triumph over " totalitarian " rationality of utilitarianism, while the Enlightened hero will actually embrace rationalism and utilitarianism, and still prove his or her love for other beings through them.

Generally approved of by Romantics, due to their associations with bravery, honourable combat, glory, individual prowess and a Dying Moment of Awesome ; By contrast, the Blood Knight is generally rejected by the Enlightenment due to a lack of discipline and respect for law and order, and encouraging a War Is Glorious attitude they view dangerous.

The Enlightenment invented nationalism, because the nation, in theory, was opposed to the kingdom and The Churchand it was a consensual secular identity around which one can build The Republicwhich until this period was contained only in city-states but now governed over areas bigger than Kingdoms and with more central authority than any King before.

This led to the idea of creating national institutions and cultural centers museums, science institutions, art galleries, monuments built to celebrate the nation, but it must be emphasized that the nation as defined by the early Enlightenment thinkers was about involvement in the community—meaning that outsiders could join the nation if they pitched in and got involved.

Team Enlightenment blames romantic sentimentality towards folklore and Rose Tinted Narrative for having corrupted nationalism from its radical origins. The Romantics who later came around to nationalism, were obsessed with folklore emphasized cultural heritage as the definition of national identity, and essentially invented the culture wars about which values and which individuals are the true representatives of the nation.

Creating Life Is Awesome: Enlightenment works are theoretically okay with this, skeptical in practise, whereas Romantics argue against playing God. The very first science-fiction, Frankenstein tackled this very concept, and it was a romantic work.

It must be noted that Enlightenment-inspired revolutions, especially the French and the Russian one, had the idea of creating "a new man" which they meant to be a citizen with values and references entirely different from the past, but which in the eyes of critics amounted to be similar to treating man as tabula rasa with new values inserted like a program given to a robot.

Curiosity Is a Crapshoot: Romanticists believe that Curiosity Killed the Castor at least make us Go Mad from the Revelation and turn us into nihilists, the Enlightened do recognize that curiosity does have its flaws, but overall it can be used for further learning and self-improvement. You can find arguments for this among both Enlightenment and Romantic schools, though more in the case of the latter.

Although democracy tends to be an Enlightened philosophy, many early Enlightened works and philosophers pondered a technocracy e.

Romanticists are more varied in their positions; some want to return to old-fashioned feudalismothers advocate for a democratic system, and often their chosen form of government is whichever form is not in place in their society. Basically, Enlightenment hates democracy because it puts truth to a popular vote rather than using reason, while Romanticism hates democracy because it becomes a bureaucratic mess where leaders care more about winning elections than ruling.

It should be noted that what is considered Democracy as we live it today where everyone can vote, no discrimination to minorities, no slavery and exploitation of other people is quite different from what many Enlightened and Romantic writers thought vis-a-vis democracy Enlightenment thinkers were content with limited suffrage, while Voltaire would probably insist that a secular France remain anti-semitic with the exception of Rousseau, Diderot, Condorcet and a few others.

Romanticists love deconstructing Enlightenment dreams into Dystopias themselves. In Romanticist dystopian fiction cf, Ayn Rand a Dystopia will usually be portrayed as an Enlightenment society that runs on Intellectually Supported Tyranny where He Who Fights Monsters becomes the same dystopia that it was trying to solve see also:In Oedipus the King, the actor playing Oedipus wore a mask showing him simply as a king, while in Oedipus at Colonus, Oedipus appears in the mask of an old man.

As Sophocles saw him — and as actors portrayed him — Oedipus displayed no personality or individuality beyond his role in the legend. In Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, the theme of fate versus free will appears often throughout the play. It is prophesied to Oedipus’s parents, Jocasta and Laius, that their son would grow up to.

Oedipus Rex, also known by its Greek title, Oedipus Tyrannus (Ancient Greek: Οἰδίπους Τύραννος IPA: [oidípuːs týranːos]), or Oedipus the King, is an Athenian tragedy by . The Concept of Fate in Oedipus Rex To the first-time reader of Sophocles’ tragedy, Oedipus Rex, it seems that the gods are in complete domination of mankind.

This essay will seek to show that this is not the case because the presence of a tragic flaw within the protagonist is .

Oedipus Rex, also known by its Greek title, Oedipus Tyrannus (Ancient Greek: Οἰδίπους Τύραννος IPA: [oidípuːs týranːos]), or Oedipus the King, is an Athenian tragedy by Sophocles that was first performed around BC. Originally, to the ancient Greeks, the title was simply Oedipus (Οἰδίπους), as it is referred to by Aristotle in the Poetics.

The Hubris of Oedipus in Oedipus the King - Hubris is defined by the Webster-Miriam dictionary as “Exaggerated pride or confidence” (Miriam-Webster Dictionary) in Oedipus the King, by Sophocles, In Oedipus The King, by Sophocles, the onslaught of pain .

An analysis of the concept of fate and destiny in oedipus the king and antigone by sophocles
Oedipus complex - Wikipedia